so far, I'm a nobody

boyirl:

An Evening In Front Of The Box, 2013Gerry Smith

boyirl:

An Evening In Front Of The Box, 2013

Gerry Smith

highqualityfashion:

"Runway" by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia January 2010

highqualityfashion:

"Runway" by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia January 2010

dekonstruktivisme:

Niels Klavers spring—summer 1999.
Fashion has gone to such extremes at the end of the millennium that designing something truly shocking practically requires an electrical socket and a bucket of water. In all the hoopla, the three-armed jacket stands out as the biggest fashion joke of them all, the most obvious example of the lengths to which some designers will go to make us sit up and take notice. Dutch designer Niels Klavers has created a jacket with multiple sleeves—his had four. He has also made three-legged pants, a four-armed sweater, and a coatdress colonised front and back by two identical coatdresses. And Klavers has done these things in all sincerity, with a straight face. “I do this work very seriously,” he says. “I don’t laugh about it. I’m not making fun with it.”
Klaver’s modus operandi is to take a side of clothing we already know, to which we have already become blinded by complete and utter familiarity, and add another dimension. His first collection, Show Me Your Second Face used what he calls “feature doubling,” or the annexation of duplicates to this effect. A pair of ordinary trousers suddenly becomes less ordinary when it had five pairs of the same trousers trailing behind it. In his second collection, which was presented in Paris as a part of group showing of the Fashion Institute Arnhem in the spring of 1999, Klavers took this idea and twisted it slightly. A jacket shifted ninety degrees on its axis, the arms protruding from the chest and back; a skirt sprouted shoulders and sleeves; a garment that may have started as a pair of pants morphed into a skirt. The models who walked the runway had their hair combed into their faces; there was no telling if they were coming or going. “We aren’t used to a top as a skirt,” Klavers says. Indeed we are not.

dekonstruktivisme:

Niels Klavers spring—summer 1999.

Fashion has gone to such extremes at the end of the millennium that designing something truly shocking practically requires an electrical socket and a bucket of water. In all the hoopla, the three-armed jacket stands out as the biggest fashion joke of them all, the most obvious example of the lengths to which some designers will go to make us sit up and take notice. Dutch designer Niels Klavers has created a jacket with multiple sleeves—his had four. He has also made three-legged pants, a four-armed sweater, and a coatdress colonised front and back by two identical coatdresses. And Klavers has done these things in all sincerity, with a straight face. “I do this work very seriously,” he says. “I don’t laugh about it. I’m not making fun with it.”

Klaver’s modus operandi is to take a side of clothing we already know, to which we have already become blinded by complete and utter familiarity, and add another dimension. His first collection, Show Me Your Second Face used what he calls “feature doubling,” or the annexation of duplicates to this effect. A pair of ordinary trousers suddenly becomes less ordinary when it had five pairs of the same trousers trailing behind it. In his second collection, which was presented in Paris as a part of group showing of the Fashion Institute Arnhem in the spring of 1999, Klavers took this idea and twisted it slightly. A jacket shifted ninety degrees on its axis, the arms protruding from the chest and back; a skirt sprouted shoulders and sleeves; a garment that may have started as a pair of pants morphed into a skirt. The models who walked the runway had their hair combed into their faces; there was no telling if they were coming or going. “We aren’t used to a top as a skirt,” Klavers says. Indeed we are not.

sirilaf:

I try to perform the “blank spaces” that are formed when everything is taken away from people. How do we come face to face with “nothing’”, with “emptiness’”, where there was something earlier?I was a refugee myself for a few years, moving from one country to another, knowing full well that at every juncture I was a guest who at any moment might be asked to leave. The refugee’s world is a portable one, allowing for easy movement between borders. It is one that can be taken away as easily as it was given: provisionally and with a little anxiety on the part of the host.
Lida Abdul - White House (2005)

sirilaf:

I try to perform the “blank spaces” that are formed when everything is taken away from people. How do we come face to face with “nothing’”, with “emptiness’”, where there was something earlier?

I was a refugee myself for a few years, moving from one country to another, knowing full well that at every juncture I was a guest who at any moment might be asked to leave. The refugee’s world is a portable one, allowing for easy movement between borders. It is one that can be taken away as easily as it was given: provisionally and with a little anxiety on the part of the host.

Lida Abdul - White House (2005)

Ryuichi Sakamoto / Avec Piano (1983) Cassette Books 思索社

endthymes:

ici et ailleurs (1976); dir. jean-luc godard

endthymes:

ici et ailleurs (1976); dir. jean-luc godard

Ulay aka Frank Uwe Laysiepen (Solingen, 30 nov. 1943) german performer and artist